Callaway Cars has built some pretty wild Corvettes and Camaros over the years, and back in 2013 they claimed they would soon be making a “shooting-brake” conversion kit for the then newly released C7 Stingray Corvette. Even back then I was somewhat skeptical about how good it would actually look and if there would be any function to the conversion.

Photo: callawaycars
Photo: callawaycars

Here we are four years later and for those that dream of having a Corvette station wagon, the day is finally here. These are official photos of what they’re calling the Corvette AeroWagen and I must admit, it looks pretty damn good. I love the look of the C7 so that could have something to do with it. What’s most impressive is how they managed to pull it off so that it looks like it came right off the factory floor.

From what I can tell there are some really good things about this new AeroWagen, and a few not so good things. Starting with the good stuff first; Callaway said they can add the conversion kit to any C7 Corvette versus having to buy one from them already built. The cost for the kit is listed at just under $15,000, which isn’t terrible in the grand scheme of aftermarket upgrades. That is of course on top of the $55K-$75K needed for the donor car. However, this kit only affects the cosmetics of the car and nothing towards the performance. If money’s not an issue, then the smart play would be to enlist they guys at Specialty Vehicle Engineering that build the 800hp Yenko Corvette and have them handle the performance, then send your car to Callaway for the shooting brake conversion. That’s not to take away anything from Callaway’s tuning ability of which they also offer top-tier performance upgrades that will rival anything on the market. But having the only Shooting Brake Yenko Corvette ever made does sound pretty sweet.

Photo: callawaycars
Photo: callawaycars

In my opinion, one of the best parts about this conversion kit, aside from how it looks, is that it’s not terribly invasive like you would think. I was expecting to hear about all sorts of cutting and welding, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. As a matter of fact, say that you spend the $15k to have it done and as soon as you take delivery of the car you realize you absolutely hate it, then you can just send the car back to Callaway and they will “undo” everything and return your baby just like it was when you dropped it off. That way you can pretend like nothing ever happened, aside from the $15K plus whatever they charge to “undo” the installation.

In regards to the negative aspects of the AeroWagen conversion, I would say the biggest one is that it doesn’t really change anything about the car with exception of the looks and possibly a few aerodynamic characteristics. I expected a decent increase of interior space but that doesn’t seem to be the case here. It’s obviously still too small to add rear seats although according to reports, Callaway did attempt to pull off a four door conversion, but the Corvette chassis made it virtually impossible to do so. About the only difference, I can see as far as additional room is that now you “might” have room for two more beginner sets of golf clubs.

Overall I think I’m sitting on the fence. It looks fantastic from most angles but there are a few that do make it look terrible. I would have a tough time dropping that kind of money on something that will only affect the cosmetics of the car. It will likely come down to personal preference on this one. But I can’t help but wonder what the gearheads of the world are going to feel about a Corvette station wagon, I mean “AeroWagen.” I’ve got a feeling it’s going to be one of those “love it or leave it” type situations.

Photo: callawaycars
Photo: callawaycars

Photos by: Callaway Cars